Whorl Pattern in the Palm – Mars

It’s quite exciting for a hand reader to find a Whorl pattern in the palm of the hand. To find a Whorl in both palms of a person’s hands is doubly sensational.

In nature, the Whorl (above) is not ordinarily found. Although you’ve probably seen them on the digits (fingers and thumbs) of the hand. The concentric circles, creating the whorl symbol, can also be found on the surface of a tree trunk after it’s been cut down.

Finding a Whorl in the Mars Mount of the hand is a big deal and must be elevated to great importance in the reading. Advanced Martian living becomes the life purpose, where the owner will feel most fulfilled and satisfied in his or her life.

 

Prints Credit: Chris Kidder, Hand Analyst

 

These two hands (above) came across my desk this week and both, belonging to the same owner, have Whorls on the Mount of Mars (inside pink colored circles). Some professional readers may call these glyphs Peacocks and I wouldn’t argue. Either way, the implication needs to be elevated to Life Purpose position.

 

About Mars

Mars (Roman)/Ares (Greek) is known as the God of War.

Ares as the embodiment of aggression, has been one of the strongest forces working through human history. He is Olympos’ “Action Man,” the god of war and strife, the restless and turbulent lover, thriving on conflict and rejoicing in the delight of battle. In Ares we see our own aggression raw and bloody, before civilization tempered or repressed it. – Arianna Stassinopoulos, The Gods of Greece

“Of the twelve Olympians, The Greeks places Ares in the least respected position because of his irrationality and battle frenzy. He represented the uncontrollable lust for battle and bloodshed. In contrast, as Mars, the Romans held him in high regard, second only to Jupiter (Roman)/Zeus (Greek) in importance.” – Jean Shinoda Bolan, Gods in Every Man

The story and imagery portrayed in mythology is fascinating. The archetypal associations in our lives is quite relevant when more deeply investigating and understanding our motivations, values and preferences.

 

Life Purpose

When describing what the Whorl in the Mars zone of the hand means to the owner, the hand reader will be spot on when dialoging about the Mars/Ares archetypal patterns of engagement.

When discussing a strong Mars Mount, Star or Whorl in this area I refer to Diana/Wonder Woman with women, Clark Kent/Superman to men and the Incredible Hulk to children and teens. Each represent Hero’s and Protectors. Brutus (as in Popeye), as Brawler, is an alternative side of Mars that will most likely be part of the owners learning journey at some point or another.

Ares and Aphrodite, Goddess of Love, were notable lovers. Both love and war come together in this union. Great passion is portrayed in love and war so unleashed passion is not surprising for the Action Wo/Man. Having an appropriate outlet for this eminent level of vitality is important for the health and well-being of this archetype.

Standing up for the underdog brings fulfillment to the owner with a well-marked Mars zone, which includes a Whorl here. The Warrior needs a cause, something to stand for, to protect. The Whorl indicates a life purpose where his or her exceptional courage and bravery must be exercised.

Martians do best when using their fierce nature, defending those who are unable to stand up for themselves – such as mistreated animals, foster children, veterans or battered women – to name a few. However, if this hero-type doesn’t have an appropriate cause for all this energy, he or she just may end up feeling weak and cowardly, or the opposite – impulsively violent.

 

Advanced Path

Just like the Lion in “Wizard of Oz,” owners of a Mars Whorl must have a bold and fearless course of action to devote their enthusiasm toward. The aim is to evolve from Ares into Mars, the battle-lusting Greek God of War into the protector of the community, successfully navigating conflict as the Roman Mars.

Look for the Mars archetype in the following vocations: Commander in Chief, Athletic coach, building demolition, construction, conflict resolution, advocacy.

Key words: Protector, passionate, naturally assertive, directed action, adventurous, impulsive, combative, impatient, forceful.

Click here to learn more about becoming professionally trained in the art and science of non-predictive hand analysis.

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Comments

Below are conversations had on Facebook about the above article after being posted:

Jennifer Hirsch such a precious find, magnificent! I wonder about the contradiction of the less assertive traits shown in the short low set water finger of the left hand…. fascinating!

American Academy of Hand Analysis Good eye Jennifer. With the low set and short Jupiter, he might go either way – less assertive and lacking confidence and/or pushy, getting angry when feeling disrespected.

Jennifer Hirsch ja! I get that 🙂 the obnoxious Napoleon thing.

Brent Bruning “The Greeks places Ares in the least respected position because of his irrationality and battle frenzy. He represented the uncontrollable lust for battle and bloodshed. In contrast, as Mars, the Romans held him in high regard, second only to Jupiter (Roman)/Zeus (Greek) in importance” — brilliant, love it. And they are overwhelmingly attracted to being the hero for underdogs no question. I found this in the horror film director Michael Steiner who wrote the film Grounding in defense of the people who lost their job, as well as a great horror film Sennentuschi. My brother has one as well – who built an international company rescuing reclaimed tai-furniture (wagon wheels) and making it as furniture. Mars has a conflict side for sure and all of them are attracted to hot irons. But they also have a playful side, the need for liberation and exalt and defend the childlike freedom and kids’s rights to explore boundaries and go through initiations. Great article. My brother below. No conflict there hahaha.

Mars Action Man

American Academy of Hand Analysis P.S. Your bro fits the Martian image!

Brent Bruning He has been a lifelong case study. Fought in high school, had the Mustang car at 14, very popular with girls and guys looked up to him, worked his way through college, fought during his graduation, left the corporation after 2 years to travel the world, surf, bartend and live in a shipping container on a beach in hawaii, start his own company, tear it all down, craft furniture, work with kids at camp, work with kids at university… everything mars.

Interview with Jennifer Hirsch

Jennifer HirschIt is truly an honor to bring to you, Jennifer Hirsch, the Founder of the Chirology Centre for the Study of Hand Reading in South Africa. She lives in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Jennifer, when and how did you start reading hands?

I began in 1991 when I had a busy massage therapy practice and was growing increasingly aware that I’d not be able to stand the pace of so many massages for too many more years. Besides, I was getting bored and felt thirsty to study.

Since young, wherever I was, people wanted to talk to me, it’s the classic ‘therapist written on the forehead’ scenario. Most of my clients would lie on the plinth and want to talk about their life challenges and I was finding it difficult to insist that they lie quietly to receive the healing. I felt the need to separate the body work from the dialogue. This combined with my teenage dream of being a psychologist had me ‘scanning’ for what to study.

I considered all the “ologies” and nearly chose graphology. But then I had a vision of myself as an elder, sitting in an armchair and holding someone’s hands in mine. It came to me in a flash, and I excitedly booked an appointment with Brian Friend, one of the only 2 palmists in Johannesburg at that time (the other was Chand Singh, both have since passed). My first lessons in classical palmistry were in January 1991 with Brian just before he died.

Are you specializing in any particular area of hand analysis? If so, what is it?

I’d say my areas of specialization are the glyphs, and counseling. I’m especially interested in listening. How to really listen, how to authentically lend my presence, so to speak.

In terms of application, I don’t specialize in anything specifically, but the majority of people who come are looking for their life-purpose. I do a lot of focusing on helping people to craft their lives, so as to align with their joy.

What is most meaningful to you about reading hands?

The sense of awe and humility I experience when holding a person’s hands and looking into their eyes. I feel immensely honored, blessed. The trust invested in me. The intimacy. The sense of transcending space/time, and being ‘on purpose’ during readings. The alchemical results, reflected back in the many testimonials I’ve received over the years, from people who’ve made optimal choices based on the guidance I’ve suggested during their reading.

Please define the term ‘chirology’

The term is from the Greek word kheri, meaning hand, and logos, or knowledge. Knowledge of the hands. Chirology is the rich and diverse study of our hands and their correspondences to our physical, emotional, vocational, intellectual and spiritual selves. It’s an umbrella term, encompasses everything to do with hands. Chirology is an evolved form of Palmistry, and an authentic counseling therapy.

Do you refer to life lesson? If so, has your life lesson ever shown up during a reading?  If so, how and what did you learn from that experience?

With the 5 element system of interpretation which I use, (unlike with Richard’s system) ‘life lesson’ isn’t specifically defined, but many life lessons weave through the readings.

My biggest life lesson is low self-esteem, which visits often. I doubt myself and my worth. I see this not good enough theme in many hands, along with issues of abandonment, abuse, guilt, trust, lack of joie de vivre, abuse, responsibility, and so on.

The extent to which I understand these challenges in myself helps determine how much I can assist others’ understanding of themselves.

Jennifer’s fingerprint patterns:

Loop Loop Loop Loop Loop
Loop Loop Loop Peacock’s eye Loop

Do you have a bad experience you can share to help others avoid a similar situation?

I learned a tough lesson when I’d just begun offering readings many years ago. A client arrived, a 54 year old Jewish woman, very kindly and motherly appearance. As I took her hand in mine, I said “You do everything for your children.” Instantly her body stiffened, she pulled her hands back and said “I don’t have any children.” Needless to say no matter how hard I tried, it proved impossible to gain any rapport with her after this. I’d tapped into her deepest wound, and made a grave error in assessment.

Moral of the story: Your opening lines need to be neutral, no room for error or tactlessness. It’s vital to begin readings with words of kindness, support, anything that establishes rapport.

What advice would you give to students of Hand Analysis?

Allow for silence. This has been challenging for me, i.e. the feeling I have to show up, be on form, and keep talking. Pauses allow for what is most alive in the person to arise. It’s best for them if we readers let them guide us. This guidance from them is accessed through our listening. I also like to ‘go where the pain is’, i.e. pay most attention to what they present as being their biggest challenge.

Don’t be in a hurry. Hand analysis is learned over many years, by osmosis and by incremental bits of application.

Many students get stuck in the all theory no practice paradigm. They struggle to feel they know enough. This is a pitfall. We are ‘qualified’ by virtue of coming from the heart. People need to be heard, not ‘accurately told’ about themselves.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions such as “What brings you?”. Occasionally you’ll have a reply like “Well you tell me!”, but mostly people will open up very readily.

Last not least: Trust your intuition. Often the hardest of all.

What intentions do you have for your Hand Analysis practice during the next six months? 

I’ll be continuing with hosting monthly topic workshops. The next one is “Signs in Hands”, a look at some of the traditionally accurate markers.

I’m writing another book, the concept is a ‘Chirology in 365 days” page-a-day lesson.

I’m also changing my current 9 lesson training course to a one year course, so re-formatting the structure of the lessons.

I’m also working on marketing my home study and Skype consultation services outside of South Africa.

You have written and published God Given Glyphs and I know this was a colossal undertaking. Congratulations! What have you found readers are benefiting from most in your book?

Thanks Kay! I’ve had fantastic feedback. People comment on how valuable and accurate a resource the enlarged fingerprint illustrations are, as well as the interpretations being accurate. They like how I interpret each position of each possible variation of glyph placement individually.

Many have appreciated the chapters on how to effectively and ethically counsel with hand reading.

Also, there’s very little published material on the 5 element system of interpretation, so for anyone interested in the system, this is a good point to start.

What is the URL to purchase your book to download?

http://godgivenglyphs.com/shop/

I believe you have done one or two Vipassanas. Is that correct? Do you see a beneficial correlation between meditation and hand reading? If so what have you found beneficial in meditation for your Chirology practice?

Yes, two Vipassanas so far. Naturally my meditation helps me to center and still myself. But also, the 5 element system of hand analysis evolved from aspects of esoteric Buddhism, where emphasis is placed upon loving kindness and compassion for our fellow man, and on the philosophy of being of service.

To find out more about Jennifer and her teachings visit: http://godgivenglyphs.com/