Scattering into Stillness

Yesterday while I was walking along a fairly deserted road in the foothills below Sequoia National Park I was overcome by an acute sense of panic.  It was hard to comprehend, at the time, because I was surrounded by some of the most majestic scenery on the planet.  My stroll took me through Oak trees of all species, bumble bee quality flowering foliage, lush green mountains, romantic rocks, and the view of Alta Peak towering at 11,000 feet.  I compare the view of Sequoia National Park to the Swiss Alps which I visited many years ago. 

During the walk I was making a conscious effort to keep my feet on the ground and to ‘slow down’.  My mind runs amok on an ‘occasional’ basis.  The more I attempted to s l o w  d o w n the more I was consumed with a greater sense of urgency to keep moving.  I actually sensed a level of guilt for not doing more. Attempting to silence my mind put me in direct contact with its opposite: sheer panic.  Why was this happening? 

I have been rewarded quite nicely by society for accomplishing results and being in constant deed. If I slow down, “What will I do?”  “Who will I be if I’m not doing something?” “OMG, I might die if I’m not producing something!”  

These are real thoughts I experienced yesterday on what I had hoped would be a peaceful outing.  It’s ironic that one of my highest priorities, right now, is to experience Stillness.  Often is the case that our truest desire puts us in direct conflict with ‘its’ opposite.  In this case: Silence vs pandemonium. 

How does this happen?  Conditioning, patterns and addictions have formulated the path of our existence.  I’m addicted to working, producing, responsibilities, tasks, schedules and the call to perfection.  I have to classify this as an addiction because of the reaction I have when I even think about not having these scenarios in my world.  This doesn’t mean those ‘things’ are bad.  I’m simply seeking an adjustment to my internal volume control.  Might you relate? 

There are specific configurations in the hands that can point to this type of internal feeding frenzy.  See if you have any of these six designs in your hands or fingerprints.  They involve either the Life Line or the Arch fingerprint. 

To see six hand print examples and the remaining article click here to open the pdf  Scattering into Stillness by Kay Packard AAHA